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The plow driver was shocked to see how open our street was compared to others.
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Curb To Curb

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It was the morning of February 11 2001 in Chicago, IL. The night before, there wasn't much snow on the ground and barely a flake falling. So to wake up at 4:00am the next morning to 4 feet of snow on the ground was a shock.

My truck was buried to the hood and you could barely see the plow. So I figured, "what the hell, lets see if she will walk out." I got in, cleared the windshield, backed up, and out she came. Now, it was time to plow.

I managed to get my street open, but all the other streets where inpassable. It was nice to see all my neighbors come out and help out. They all moved their cars to the middle of street and I cleared the whole street, curb to curb. By the time the city plowers made their way down our street, all he had to do was salt. The plow driver was shocked to see how open our street was compaired to others.

Neighbors offered me money for clearing the street, but I took nothing. I told them that we all live here, so let's just help each other out. It's sad but you really don't see that much anymore. After I got the street open, it was time to start hitting my accounts. It took a couple days to get everything open because there weren't many places to keep pushing all the snow.

A few days passed, and to my surprise I received a gas card in the mail. To this day we haven't seen a storm like that, but it's Chicago and it could happen at any time.

The plow driver was shocked to see how open our street was compared to others.

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