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I had to push it left and right, alternating pushes, and it was still piling on top of the hood of my F-350.
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Drifts in the Driveway

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I have a customer that has a 3,000 ft gravel driveway, with the final 1/3 of it running uphill to his house. The wind blows constantly on this hill so drifting is a major issue. The house sits far enough off the road where it is not accessible unless the driveway is plowed, so it NEEDS to be kept clean for obvious emergency reasons.

I showed up one night to plow after a major snowstorm hit us. It dumped 26" of snow on us, so I plowed this driveway several times to try to stay ahead of it. But even so, towards the end when the storm was letting up and the winds were picking up, the drifting began. I returned to the driveway to find that the bank at the road stood 6ft high. Luckily, I had an 1-ton diesel truck and an 8'6" WESTERN MVP3 plow.

I started to chip away at the mouth and gained entry. The snow was so deep that even in V-mode I had to push it left and right, alternating pushes, and it was still piling on top of the hood of my F-350. In many places the drifts were as high as the hood of the truck and I had to keep the blade raised to break the drift and push it to the side before dropping for a clean push. It took me over 2 hours to reach the uphill portion. I couldn't get enough traction for a good push, so I had to turn around, back my truck up the hill into the drifted snow at "ramming speed", drop the blade, and push it down the hill.

Each pass I had to take it the length of the driveway to get rid of it, which meant also backing the length of the driveway to get the next bite. All in all, it took me 4 hours to plow this one driveway which normally took 20 minutes. The side banks of the driveway were even with the window sill on the doors.

I had to push it left and right, alternating pushes, and it was still piling on top of the hood of my F-350.

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